Miley Cyrus and Major Lazor’s double assault on black women

by Rachel Bell on September 8, 2013

Nicola Adams may be in the M & S ad campaign, a symbol of her acceptance into mainstream Middle England, but racism and sexism in music videos is taking black women’s status hurling backwards.

Miley Cyrus has joined pop’s sex industry bandwagon by stripping and objectifying herself and framing it as ‘shocking’, when, from Gaga, Perry and Madonna to Britney, Kylie, Xtina and Beyonce, this route couldn’t be more conventional. With her Wrecking Ball video – revolting, artless rumpelstiltskin-like pornographer Terry Richardson directs so it’s an overused formula anyway – Cyrus is merely continuing the Disney kid tradition (Justin Timberlake being a very keen follower) that female nakedness objectified is outré. Cyrus is adopting ‘twerking’, the black women’s dance move with PR gusto. Before her performance with Robin Thicke at the VMAs in which she accessorised the male artist by twerking at his crotch, Cyrus was using black women twerking in her video for ‘We Can’t Stop’. Like the black and white male rap artists before her, Cyrus is sexualising black women at the expense of their humanity, turning them into faceless creatures whose butts define them. In response to the media attention of the VMA’s, Cyrus cringily boasted that she ‘made history’. Unable to desist from exposing her new gluten free body, she appears to believe that ‘amazing body’ makes her ‘amazing’ too. Nothing new there I guess. But Cyrus has simply taken history in the same shitty direction it’s always been for black women. The bottom of the pile. Nicola Adams made history in the Olympics Miley.

The sexism and racism that infuses the representation of women in porn and has long been adopted by pop, has sinked a level deeper in the video from Major Lazer.

Here black and white women are pitted against each other, with the underlying message that skinny, dippy rhythm-less white girls need to learn how to do sex from black women. The video uses comedy and violence to get away with a rape scene. The black woman is cast as an oversized alien with black snake-like tentacles coming out of her mouth. She forces her tentacles into the white women’s anuses to inflate their asses to ‘black women size’. Message: with their new oversize asses, the white women are now as ripe for sexual reduction as the black bitches.

I heard about this video by reading a Guardian blog by Ikamara Larasi, who, along with Object and End Violence Against Women and Imkaan, are getting 17-24 year olds to speak out against sexism and racism in music videos by developing a site and mobile app. From Robin Thicke’s stereotyped message that good white girls need a good rape to Major Lazer using the sci-fi comedy model to devalue rape, violence against women is integral to the racism and sexism in modern day pop.

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